Learn, Share, Grow – Learning from Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Blue Courage team is dedicated to continual learning and growth.  We have adopted a concept from Simon Sinek’s Start With Why team called “Learn, Share, Grow”.  We are constantly finding great articles, videos, and readings that have so much learning.  As we learn new and great things, this new knowledge should be shared for everyone to then grow from.

Below is a lesson from toptenz.net on 10 Things You Can Learn From Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as our key learning.

http://www.toptenz.net/10-things-you-can-learn-from-martin-luther-king-jr.php

10 Things You Can Learn From Martin Luther King, Jr.

By ELIZABETH DOWNING January 19, 2010

On the nationally observed Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, take a second to learn a little bit about the man and his mission, and the bits of wisdom you can take from a quick look at an amazing life.

10. Sometimes things don’t always go as planned…

Continue reading here.

 

Our Key Learnings:

Dr. King epitomizes qualities of leadership and self-sacrifice in the face of overwhelming odds. As we celebrate his life on the day set aside to honor him, let’s look back at some of the most important events in his life. From them, there are plenty of lessons we can apply in our own lives – both personal and professional.

  • Life will throw things at you. Things don’t always go as planned but everything happens for a reason.
  • Passion will always persuade people! You may not agree with what is said, but you will always be moved by eloquent words.
  • We are better together, than we are alone! No man or woman is an island. You must have friends, a support system. Life is about relationships.
  • It’s not about you! We are all in this together.
  • We must stand for what we believe in. The impact could last a lifetime and affect future generations.
  • Violence and hatred have never been the answer, but the power of love, compassion, empathy – that IS the answer.
  • Do something! After Dr. King’s arrest, he did not give up his cause. His 20-page response became a populist battle cry against injustice. Turning on phrases like “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere,” and “One has not only a legal but a moral responsibility to obey just laws. Conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.” Dr. King parlayed his own personal setback into a greater motivator for an entire social cause. Nothing would stop him.
  • People won’t always like you, appreciate you, or accept you but be you. No matter what color you are, what religion you are, what you look like, what you sound like, and no matter where you’re from. You belong.

Beyond the lasting impact of Dr. King’s contribution to our society, his methods and reactions linger as important lessons that can be applied to challenging situations in life. From confronting difficult relationships with peers, to challenging accepted social norms, even to overcoming personal tragedy, his life is a legacy of lessons that each of us can apply in our own lives.


Article: Courage It’s More Than You Think (Improving Police)

Courage: It’s More Than You Think

BY A VETERAN CHIEF WHO IS COMMITTED TO IMPROVING POLICE LEADERSHIP, TRUST, EFFECTIVENESS, AND OFFICER SAFETY.

“The mental or moral strength to venture, persevere, and withstand danger, fear, or difficulty; from the Latin “cor “– heart.*

Courage, of course, is what every police officer wants and aspires. Without it, a police officer cannot do his or her duties and will not be accepted by others in the ranks.

But what is often forgotten is that courage is more than running toward gunshots while everyone else runs away from them — and it is more than checking out a dark building on an even-darker night. Yes, courage is physical bravery, but courage is also five other actions in the face of danger that are just as important for a 21st century police officer.

 

Read more by clicking here, or at the link below.

https://improvingpolice.wordpress.com/2018/01/13/courage-its-more-than-you-think/


Illuminate (January 2018)

Welcome to the Inaugural Issue of


Your Learning Journal

January 2018

 

Rise Up in 2018: A Blue Courage Moment

By Michael Nila 

Can we be as big or bigger than this moment or will the moment swallow us up because we are not willing to rise up, fight to remain standing and meet this moment with the full force and fury of our fearless conviction?

Rise up with no expectation but fueled with hope for what might be, for what is possible. Some call that a fairy tale and say it in a way that screams of foolishness – I prefer the power of believing what people of courage, hope and humility can create together. I prefer to march boldly in the direction of my dreams rather than to shrink in the shadows of my circumstances.

Many say “but I am damaged goods” – news flash — we are ALL damaged! Damaged deeply by our yesterdays, by our mistakes and misjudgments, by the others who, because of their smallness and weakness, have left scars and imprints on our soul. I refuse to let my yesterday determine my today and tomorrow. I refuse to allow the smallest people in my life to be more powerful influences on me than the amazing people who have gifted me by their presence in my life. I refuse to allow my scars, memories, and pain to be anything more than fuel for who I can become and for my happiness, health and well-being.

So I can say what I want, or say nothing; I can choose to act, to DO something or choose to do nothing – but can I strive to be as big or bigger than “this moment?” That IS my challenge. What I choose in this moment will shape my forever! “What is this moment asking of me?”

Choice: Life gives us choice; it does not give us a crystal ball. Choice does not give us certainty and control — it gives us a chance; a choice to roll the dice! A choice and chance to play or turn away because one outcome is that I might lose. But if I don’t even play, I have no chance to win! I always hear people say, “I don’t know how to play,” but there’s only one way to learn to play and that is by getting into the game. Make 2018 the year we all say, “Yes! I am all in!”


Mindfulness

Guided Meditations with davidji

90-Second Stress Buster!

We all experience various levels of stress throughout the day. As we know stress is neither good or bad, it is our response to the moments that determine their impact on us emotionally and physically. As stressful situations occur – a difficult conversation, a conflict with another individual, a project deadline, an argument with a family member, the traffic in the morning’s commute – these experiences build upon each other. Cortisol, the fight or flight hormone builds rather than dissipates, and this can be toxic to your health while negatively affecting those around you. Taking a moment to quiet your mind, and interrupt the pattern of stressful thoughts gives you emotional space allowing you to reset your attitude, actions, and reactions. Our 90-second stress buster is a tool to help you combat the stresses of the day.

https://davidji.com

 

 


Feeding the Mind

Recommended Reading

 

“Legacy: What the All Blacks Can Teach Us About the Business of Life” by James Kerr

The legendary All Blacks rugby team of New Zealand is one of the world’s most successful sporting teams. How do they accomplish this challenging feat of being one of the best sports teams year after year? What are their secrets for success? This book is an intriguing and inspirational read for all leaders and team members. It takes dedication and hard work from everyone on the team to continually be successful at the highest levels of the game. Individual and team efforts in ownership, leadership, and accountability can help to turn vision into action, with purposeful practice to achieve desired results.

Why you should read this book:

“Legacy” shares valuable leadership and life mastery lessons necessary for success in today’s advancing world. The All Blacks rugby team began to face challenges and struggles, leading to a complete cultural overhaul. Key leadership on the team began to realize that there are certain aspects crucial to the continuous success of the team, for example:

  • After celebrating a win, two of the senior players pick up a broom and sweep the sheds, properly so no one else has to. “No one looks after the All Blacks – the All Blacks look after themselves.” They are humble warriors – never too big to do the small things.
  • “Better people make better All Blacks.” To be better at what you do, be a better person.
  • “Human beings are motivated by purpose, autonomy and a drive towards mastery. Accomplished leaders create an environment in which their people can develop their skills, their knowledge and their character. This leads to a learning environment and a culture of curiosity, innovation and continuous improvement.”
  • What legacy are you creating? Stephen Covey said, “Begin with the end in mind.” As James Kerr says,” If we’re going to lead a life, if we’re going to lead anything, we should surely know where we are going, and why.”

This book is filled with great wisdom and learning that leads to success, and ultimately leads to an outstanding legacy. Anyone of influence should add this book to their “must read” list.

Purchase the book: click here.

 

Subscribe to our Daily Dose of Blue Courage to receive daily quotes of inspiration. Click here.

Subscribe to our Learn, Share, Grow series where we share short lessons that we discover from articles, videos, and blogs. Click here.

 


Learn, Share, Grow – The Most Selfish Word is “I”

The Blue Courage team is dedicated to continual learning and growth.  We have adopted a concept from Simon Sinek’s Start With Why team called “Learn, Share, Grow”.  We are constantly finding great articles, videos, and readings that have so much learning.  As we learn new and great things, this new knowledge should be shared for everyone to then grow from.

Below is a lesson from Gaur Gopal Das on the most selfish word, as well as our key learning.

 

 

Key Learnings:

  • Everything revolves around “I”
  • “I” Stands for expectations – “I should be treated like…” “I should be loved like…” “I should be respected like…” – Super high expectations.  “My opinions, my desires, my likes/dislikes, I love this…
  • We only learn to take – everyone has to fulfill my expectations.
  • John F. Kennedy: “Ask not what your country can do for you, but ask what you can do for your country.”
  • The more we lead a life of “I”, our “I” will always be frustrated – people don’t exist just to fulfill your expectations.
  • Be realistic in your expectations – not everyone will meet them.
  • Avoid “I” by serving others.
  • When you want to be served, you’re dependent on people.  They may not want to serve you.
  • When you serve, who can stop you?
  • When you want respect, or love, people may not respect or love you.
  • When you give respect or love, who can stop you?
  • Learn to begin your journey from “I” to “You” – the more you want for yourself, you will be frustrated.  The more you want to give, you will remain happy.

Learn, Share, Grow – What’s In Your Cup?

The Blue Courage team is dedicated to continual learning and growth.  We have adopted a concept from Simon Sinek’s Start With Why team called “Learn, Share, Grow”.  We are constantly finding great articles, videos, and readings that have so much learning.  As we learn new and great things, this new knowledge should be shared for everyone to then grow from.

Below is a lesson from an unknown source on reflecting on what is inside of you.

 

You are holding a cup of coffee when someone comes along and bumps into you or shakes your arm, making you spill your coffee everywhere.

Why did you spill the coffee?

You answer, “Well, because someone bumped into me, of course!”

Though this is what happened, the reality is this:

You spilled the coffee because there was  coffee in your cup.

Had there been tea in the cup, you would have spilled tea.

Whatever is inside the cup, is what will spill out.

Therefore, when life comes along and shakes you (which WILL happen), whatever is inside you will come out. It’s easy to fake it until you get rattled.

So we have to ask ourselves… “what’s in my cup?”

When life gets tough, what spills over?

Joy, gratefulness, peace and humility?

Or anger, bitterness, harsh words and reactions?

You have the opportunity to choose!

Today let’s work towards filling our cups with gratitude, forgiveness, joy, words of affirmation, kindness, understanding, courage, resilience, awareness and love for others.

 

Let’s make 2018 the best year yet – a year committed to filling our mind, heart, and spirit with positivity, allowing us to then serve others to the best of our ability. Make it a year of inspiration!


Learn, Share, Grow – I See You

The Blue Courage team is dedicated to continual learning and growth.  We have adopted a concept from Simon Sinek’s Start With Why team called “Learn, Share, Grow”.  We are constantly finding great articles, videos, and readings that have so much learning.  As we learn new and great things, this new knowledge should be shared for everyone to then grow from.

Below is a lesson from the Northern Natal Tribe of South Africa on the Spirit of Ubuntu, as well as our key learnings.

Key Learnings:

  • Sawa Bona – “I see you.” Greeting in the Northern Natal Tribe of South Africa (Spirit of Ubuntu).
  • Sikhona – “I am here.” The response to the greeting.
  • It’s about brining others into existence – taking the time to see the essence of who they truly are.
  • A person is a person because of other people.

This holiday season, we encourage you to reflect on the Spirit of Ubuntu.  Think about the power of Sawa Bona – I see you – and the response of Sikhona – I am here.  I am who I am; I am in existence because you brought me into existence by acknowledging me, seeing the humanness in me, seeing me for who I am.

Think about your day to day interactions — who do you acknowledge as you go about your day?  Who do you bring into existence?  Who do you leave invisible to you?  Every day, we are presented with the opportunity to acknowledge those who step into our lives, even if for a brief moment — the grocery store clerk, the bathroom attendant, the restaurant server — even those we see as of great importance to us: our elderly parent, our growing child, our estranged relative or friend. Perhaps you were the one at one point who was invisible to another person.

Now is a great time to embrace the Spirit of Ubuntu and make it a daily habit.  A simple smile or hello can inspire a person’s day, provide hope to someone in need, or let someone know that they matter. Together, we can make a difference and set into motion a campaign of kindness and acknowledgment!


Learn, Share, Grow – Carpe Punctum

The Blue Courage team is dedicated to continual learning and growth.  We have adopted a concept from Simon Sinek’s Start With Why team called “Learn, Share, Grow”.  We are constantly finding great articles, videos, and readings that have so much learning.  As we learn new and great things, this new knowledge should be shared for everyone to then grow from.

Below is a blog/video from Optimize on seizing the moments vs seizing the day, as well as key learnings.

https://www.optimize.me/plus-one/carpe-punctum/?mc_cid=55849c9dec&mc_eid=%5BUNIQID%5D

(Video available in the above link.)

In our last +1, we talked about the ancient roots of the phrase carpe diem—seize the day. We learned that a more accurate translation would be “Pluck the day”—as in: it’s ripe and ready to enjoy!

But, here’s the deal.

We can’t actually pluck or seize a DAY.

We can only pluck or seize (or squander) the MOMENT.

Therefore, as Dan Millman tells us in Everyday Enlightenment, the phrase we really want to get fired up about is carpe punctum—seize this moment.

Carpe punctum.

I fell so in love with that phrase when I first heard it over a decade ago that “punctum” became my go-to password. (Hah. And… Shhhhh… 😃)

Carpe punctum.

Moment to moment to moment we have the opportunity to step forward into growth and actualize our potential.

Carpe punctum.

Moment to moment to moment we have the opportunity to live with areté and experience the joy of high fiving our inner daimon.

Carpe punctum.

Today’s +1: Let’s see how many of those moments we can pluck as we savor the joy of a life well lived.

Optimize +1

 

Key Learning:

  • Carpe diem – seize the day – the more accurate translation is “pluck the day”
  • We can’t actually pluck or seize a day – we can only pluck or seize a moment
  • Carpe Punctum – seize the moment
  • Moment to moment we have the opportunity to step forward into growth and actualize our potential

 

 


Learn, Share, Grow – The 10,000-Experiment Rule

The Blue Courage team is dedicated to continual learning and growth.  We have adopted a concept from Simon Sinek’s Start With Why team called “Learn, Share, Grow”.  We are constantly finding great articles, videos, and readings that have so much learning.  As we learn new and great things, this new knowledge should be shared for everyone to then grow from.

Below is an article from medium.com on the 10,000 Experiment Rule to drive ideas, as well as key learnings.

https://medium.com/the-mission/forget-about-the-10-000-hour-rule-7b7a39343523

Forget The 10,000-Hour Rule; Edison, Bezos, & Zuckerberg Follow The 10,000-Experiment Rule

By Michael Simmons
Serial Entrepreneur / Bestselling Author / Forbes, Fortune, Time, HBR Contributor / Personal Site: http://t.co/T32xDLUBLJ
Oct 26

Most people think that Edison invented the first light bulb.

They’re wrong.

In fact, Edison was spectacularly late to the game.

In 1878, when the 36-year-old inventor decided to focus on building a light bulb, 23 others had already invented early versions called arc lamps, some of which were being used commercially to light streets and large buildings.

So how did Edison win in such a crowded field when he was so far behind?

He and his team spent a year working day and night doing thousands of experiments. On October 21, 1879, they succeeded, creating a light bulb for everyday use in the home.

Edison would go on to pioneer five different multibillion-dollar fields with his invention factory: electricity, motion pictures, telecommunications, batteries, and sound recording. In today’s terms, you can think of Edison as Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and Mark Zuckerberg all rolled into one.

What was the key to Edison’s incredible success? In two words — deliberate experimentation. For Edison, building a company was synonymous with building an invention factory.

(Continue reading here.)

 

Key Learnings:

  • Do 3 experiments a day
  • You never know which will be a success
  • To know what to focus on you need to try many things
  • Start each day with not only a to-do list but a to-test list.
  • At the heart of the scientific method is experimentation: develop a hypothesis, perform a test to prove the hypothesis right or wrong, analyze the results, and create a new hypothesis based on what you learned. The 10,000-experiment rule takes this proven power of experimentation out of the lab and into day-to-day life
  • In any given field, the top 10% of performers produce more than 50% of breakthroughs
  • Why don’t we do experiments?
    • We live in a time where we are obsessed with productivity: do more in less time
    • Experiments are time intensive
  • If you do enough experiments, the odds are in your favor
  • One big winner pays more than enough for all the losing experiments
  • Today’s tools allows for anyone to increase their quantity of experimentation
  • 2 steps to change everything:
    • Identify at least 1 jackpot experiment that could change your life – make it easy to do (cost and time), potential to be life changing, reasonable probability to pay off.
    • Run 3 experiment tests each day.  Identify tests at the start of each day, collect data throughout the day, toward the end of the day, analyze the data.  Try it for 1 month.

Learn, Share, Grow – How to Think Like Elon Musk

The Blue Courage team is dedicated to continual learning and growth.  We have adopted a concept from Simon Sinek’s Start With Why team called “Learn, Share, Grow”.  We are constantly finding great articles, videos, and readings that have so much learning.  As we learn new and great things, this new knowledge should be shared for everyone to then grow from.

Below is an article from Fortune.com on what Elon Musk did differently to be so successful, as well as key learnings.

http://fortune.com/2016/08/11/how-to-think-like-elon-musk/

How to Think Like Elon Musk

By Michael Simmons and Ian Chew August 11, 2016

How is it even possible that Elon Musk could build four multibillion companies by his mid-40s — in four separate fields (software, energy, transportation, and aerospace)?

To explain Musk’s success, others have pointed to his heroic work ethic (he regularly works 85-hour weeks), his ability to set reality-distorting visions for the future, and his incredible resilience.

But all of these felt unsatisfactory to me. Plenty of people have these traits. I wanted to know what he did differently.

As I kept reading dozens of articles, videos, and books about Musk, I noticed a huge piece of the puzzle was missing. Conventional wisdom says that in order to become world-class, we should only focus on one field. Musk breaks that rule. His expertise ranges from rocket science, engineering, physics, and artificial intelligence to solar power and energy.

In a previous article, I call people like Elon Musk “expert-generalists” (a term coined by Orit Gadiesh, chairman of Bain & Company). Expert-generalists study widely in many different fields, understand deeper principles that connect those fields, and then apply the principles to their core specialty.

Based on my own unscientific review of Musk’s life and the academic literature related to learning and expertise, I’m convinced that we should learn across multiple fields in order to increase our odds of breakthrough success.

(Continue reading the article here.)

 

Key Learnings:

  • Expert-generalist – studies widely in many different fields, understands deeper principles that connect those fields, applies the principles to their core specialty.
  • We should learn across multiple fields to increase odds of breakthrough success.
  • Learning across multiple fields provides an information advantage, therefore an innovation advantage.
  • Most people focus in just one field.
  • Each new field we learn that’s unfamiliar to others in our field gives us the ability to make combinations they cannot.
  • Musk would read 2 books per day in various topics – thirst for knowledge.
  • Learning transfer – taking what we learn in one context and applying it to another.  Musk uses a 2 step process.
    • Step 1: deconstruct knowledge into fundamental principles – view knowledge as a semantic tree. Understand the fundamental principles (trunk and big branches) before the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on.
      • Contrast case – by looking at lots of diverse cases when we learn anything, you begin to instinctively understand what is essential and craft your own unique combinations.
      • Explore lots of different approaches, deconstruct each one, compare and contrast them – helps to uncover underlying principles.
    • Step 2: Reconstruct foundational principles into new ways (for Musk, it was artificial intelligence, technology, physics, engineering).
  • Ask yourself 2 questions to hone your skills – which build brain muscles to make connections across traditional boundaries:
    • What does this remind me of?
    • Why does it remind me of it?
  • Learn core concepts across fields and relate those concepts back to our life and the world – transferring between areas becomes much easier and faster.

Article: A Hippocratic Oath for Policing (Police Foundation)

A Hippocratic Oath for Policing

Sgt. Jeremiah P. Johnson
Darien (CT) Police Department

The recent spotlight on deadly use-of-force encounters has led John Jay College of Criminal Justice Professor David Kennedy to ruminate whether the field of policing should have its own Hippocratic Oath.

The Hippocratic Oath is commonly encapsulated as “do no harm.” Medicine’s Hippocratic Oath has changed form since the days of ancient Greece, but its spirit lives on among physicians.

Police are society’s physicians, the kind that still make house calls.

It is the physician’s job to examine the patient, diagnose the underlying condition and prescribe an effective course of treatment. A doctor that only attends to visible symptoms, provides ineffective medicine, or treats in a manner that is ultimately harmful has failed the patient.

Policing is indeed strong medicine and can produce miraculous cures. However, we in law enforcement are all too ready to focus singularly on the visible symptoms of crime, overprescribe our favorite medications without due regard for their deleterious side effects, or rely on untested remedies that have been handed down through tradition instead of science.

 

Continue reading here.

A Hippocratic Oath for policing