May 10, 2021

Below is a lesson from Lion’s Roar on what it means to truly see each other, as well as our key learnings.

The Blue Courage team is dedicated to continual learning and growth.  We have adopted a concept from Simon Sinek’s Start With Why team called “Learn, Share, Grow”.  We are constantly finding great articles, videos, and readings that have so much learning.  As we learn new and great things, this new knowledge should be shared for everyone to then grow from.


I See You, I Am Here: The Secret to Heartfelt Communication

BY STEPHEN MURPHY-SHIGEMATSU

Today we are more isolated than ever, and even more aware of our longing for connection and community. Many of us are reflecting on how much we value our human connections and how little we do to cultivate them, to express appreciation for others, and to feel grateful for what they do for us every day of our lives. We are realizing how much our existence depends on others.

Even as we long for more connection and feeling of community, we are locked into rituals and habits in which we encounter each other in our daily lives without really connecting. When we say, “Hello,” or even “How are you?” we do it as a routine, without meaning, and hope we simply get a similarly standard response. We rarely look into each other’s eyes. We feel and act as if we are too busy to stop, engage with, and get to know the people with whom we interact.

Continue Reading Here.


Key Learnings:

  • Truly seeing others is a basic form of respect. The words Latin origin respicere – “to see clearly”. 
  • When we really see another we see their humanity — our common humanity — and we see our mutual vulnerability. 
  • Real seeing brings light, and inspires and empowers both seer and seen.
  • Sawubona— Zulu word. Common greeting in parts of South Africa. It means”I see you” and the response is “I see you too” or “I am here.” It honors the mystery that we are here together in this moment. 
  • When people practice Sawubona — they feel connected, they feel seen — respected and valued. 
  • Words alone don’t solve deep-seeded problems, but words can open our hearts and see the other person — we see that there are no enemies. 
  • The key is what each of us are doing spiritually in that moment — being mindful, noticing others, acknowledging their existence. 
  • Sawubona consciousness leads to peaceful, nonviolent communication and can be done in formal and informal situations, with individuals or with groups.